Takoda May Mulligan Event

TAKODA MAY MULLIGAN GOLF EVENT

Monday May 22nd, 2017
Minneapolis Golf Club

More Details to Follow!

Spring is near—a time for fresh air, new beginnings AND an improved golf game. Forget about every mulligan you took during the last round you played and join us at the Takoda May Mulligan Golf Tournament.
In life, a mulligan is just par for the course. It’s a do-over after a missed shot. A fresh start. The choice to try again rather than give up. Students at Takoda Institute take every mulligan they are given and turn it into a victory as they enroll, learn and graduate with a promising career pathway in IT, healthcare, or business. This event will raise funds for scholarships to allow us to match the needs of a wider variety of students.

We can’t wait to see you out on the field!

Go here to buy your tickets!

Interested in being a sponsor?   Check out our sponsorship packages here!

Making the Invisible Visible; A Policy Blueprint from Urban Indian America

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Monday, October 10, 2016
DoubleTree, St. Paul
5:30pm- social hour & networking
6pm- dinner & program

American Indian OIC and partners representing the Minneapolis/St. Paul urban Indian community will observe Indigenous People’s Day by hosting the working event, Making the Invisible Visible; A Policy Blueprint from Urban Indian America. From Making the Invisible Visible; A Policy Blueprint from Urban Indian America by the National Urban Indian Family Coalition:

The erasure or rendering of Native people invisible has been and remains a key factor limiting the opportunities and wellbeing of our communities. Native people residing in urban areas are amongst the most invisibilized populations in the nation, yet represent a significant portion of Native people in the United States: 72% of all American Indian/Alaska Natives and 78% of all American Indian Alaska Natives children live in cities. This invisibility has created and perpetuates extreme disparities across all the major sectors of life and community for tribal citizens living in cities including: children and family services, housing and homelessness, economic development and employment, and health and wellness (including the justice system). The lack of access to policy making or representation in current initiatives makes remedying these gross inequities especially challenging. Thus there has been insufficient efforts to develop comprehensive national policy or effective infrastructure at the local, state, and federal levels to serve urban Native communities. This absence has manifested in profound inequities in the distribution of resources, and access to high quality programming and services for Native people living in cities. 

Keynote Speaker & Moderator:janeen-comenote-headshot
Janeen Comenote is a founding member and director of the National Urban Indian Family Coalition.  She has spent the last 10 years advocating for American Indians/Alaska Native who live off reservations and endeavoring to provide a voice to this often “silent majority” in Indian Country.  She is the author of Making the Invisible Visible; A Policy Blueprint from Urban Indian America.

Speakers & Panelists:
Representative Peggy Flanagan, Minnesota House of Representatives
Dr. Joe Hobot, American Indian OIC
Mary LaGarde, Minneapolis American Indian Center
Robert Lilligren, Native American Community Development Institute
Patina Park, Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center

Co-Hosts:
[bscolumns class=”one_half”]Ain Dah Yung Center
American Indian Community Development Corporation
American Indian Movement Interpretive Center
Bii Gii Wiin CDLF
Division of Indian Work
Little Earth of United Tribes

[/bscolumns][bscolumns class=”one_half_last_clear”] MIGIZI Communications
Minneapolis American Indian Center
Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center
Native American Community Development Institute
Nawayee Center School
Northwest Indian Community Development Center

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Sponsor:
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Letter to the Minneapolis City Council from the Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors

To the Members of the Minneapolis City Council –

This letter has been written on behalf of the Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors Group with full unanimity to achieve the following purposes:

1) To formally announce our collective opposition to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in order to protect our natural fresh water supply, Mother Earth, and our teyospaye who live on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. This pipeline represents a very real threat to the integrity of our fresh water supply in the region, as well as to the surrounding natural ecosystem.

2) To collectively urge the Minneapolis City Council to follow suit and stand proudly in solidarity with the Urban American Indian community leaders here in the Twin Cities, the people of Standing Rock, and with all of the Indigenous and non-Indigenous warriors currently maintaining a peaceful vigil in protection of our natural water supply. Such solidarity can be powerfully exhibited through your approval of the Indigenous Resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline Resolution introduced by Council Member Cano on August 19th, 2016 – and that currently has 11 Council Members listed as co-authors.

There is nothing more sacred than the gifts given to us by the grace of the creator in the form of the natural bounty that sustains our ability to live. Of all these gifts bestowed upon us, there is nothing more important than clean water.

On behalf of all creation, with a full understanding that your actions today will be held to account by our children and our children’s children, the membership of MUID calls on the full support of this body to stand together with our American Indian community who is in resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Mni Waconi. Water is life.

Wopila Tanka and Chii Migwetch!

Joe Hobot, Ed.D
Chair, Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors Group
President & CEO, American Indian OIC
Hunk Papa, Lakota, Standing Rock Reservation

Governor Dayton Appoints AIOIC President to Minnesota Job Skills Partnership Board

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Governor Mark Dayton recently appointed American Indian OIC’s president and CEO, Dr. Joe Hobot, to the Minnesota Job Skills Partnership board. The Minnesota Job Skills Partnership works with businesses and educational institutions to train or retrain workers, expand work opportunities, and keep high-quality jobs in the state. The board is comprised of public, private, and educational leaders who are tasked with ensuring the ongoing stability and growth of the state’s economy and labor force- principally through the management of the Dislocated Worker program and the issuance of grants and other supportive measures.

In his role as a member of the board, Dr. Hobot will ensure that underrepresented communities, particularly the American Indian community, remain a vibrant part of the conversations, planning, and resource allocations administered by the Minnesota Job Skills Partnership. Dr. Hobot is most excited about the timing of his appointment as Minnesota enters into a critical state of change- demographically and economically- whereby the decisions of the board today have a very clear impact on the state’s long-term vitality.

Follow this link to learn more about the Minnesota Job Skills Partnership
Follow these links to learn more about Dr. Joe Hobot and American Indian OIC.

We Stand with Standing Rock

American Indian OIC stands in solidarity with the Lakota Nation of Standing Rock as they refuse the incursion of the Dakota Access Pipeline from being constructed near vital waterways – including the Missouri River – directly adjacent to their tribal lands and natural water supplies. This pipeline represents a direct and lethal threat to both the water and our tiyospaye who live on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. For the sake of the water, Mother Earth, and our children, the construction of this hazardous and unsecure pipeline cannot be allowed to happen.

This is a dangerous exploitation of our Mother Earth and American Indian OIC fully supports the warriors fighting the battle on the protest’s front lines. We implore our community members and our non-Native allies and accomplices to sign the Stop the Dakota Access Pipeline petition and to make a contribution to the warriors’ litigation fund.

Water is life. Mni Waconi.

For a brief history of the DAPL, follow this link.

AIOIC recognized for its work

American Indian OIC (AIOIC) was recently recognized by the First Nations Development Institute, the Kresge Foundation, and the National Urban Indian Family Coalition for its work helping Native Americans living in urban areas attain meaningful employment.

The group partnered with AIOIC to help more individuals of Native descent break into technology careers. According to the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, of the 34,000 “computer systems design and related services” workers in the state, only 180 or .5% identified as American Indian. AIOIC is working to change this by providing rigorous training for good-paying, in-demand technology jobs through its accredited career college, the Takoda Institute of Higher Education.

78% of Native Americans live off reservation and the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area is a major hub for these individuals. American Indian OIC’s participants are affiliated with 35 different tribal nations from throughout the United States and Canada and the organization is honored to be recognized for its work serving this community.

AIOIC’s Takoda Institute plays a key role in bolstering minority IT workers

Excerpts from the Star Tribune Article of the same name by Neal St. Anthony.

Jaquan Sloan worked in retail, home health care and building security for nearly a decade after high school.

Usually part-time and without benefits. Never more than $12 an hour.

Sloan, 28, who grew up in Harlem, the son of a security guard and transit worker, moved to the Twin Cities in 2011.

An aunt who employed him in her home health care agency closed the business and Sloan took a part-time security job in 2013. He was at a Minnesota state employment office on E. Lake Street when he saw a flier for a nine-month training program for computer support careers at the Takoda Institute of the American Indian OIC (AIOIC), the longtime south Minneapolis nonprofit training school.

“I liked computers,” recalled Sloan, the expert with electronics and software growing up in his family’s apartment.

 Sloan enrolled, worked up to 40 hours weekly as a security guard to make rent and tuition, and graduated in late 2014.  Sloan landed a job soon after at Dell Compellent in Eden Prairie. He’s already been promoted to an analyst job, working with data-storage customers.

The job pays $27 an hour, plus “great benefits,” Sloan said. “[AIOIC] was the greatest life decision I’ve ever made. The students ranged from people with four-year degrees to some who didn’t know anything but to turn on the computer.”

Sloan, who now can afford an apartment without roommates, works three 12-hour shifts weekly at Dell, and plans to earn a degree in business.

“I have a savings account and a plan for my future,” Sloan said.

Opportunity gap

Sloan is one success story in the effort to close a troubling opportunity gap between people of color and whites. He’s also an emerging face of tomorrow’s Minnesota tech workforce captured in subtle trends emerging in state jobs data.

For example, minorities accounted for about 9 percent of the 143,000 workers in the “professional, technical and scientific” job category according to 2015 statistics from the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED). Their ranks are growing fast.

Minority employment grew 20 percent to 13,084 jobs from 2014 to 2015. White employment grew 11.9 percent to 129,948. Black employment year-over-year grew by 51 percent to 3,624 jobs last year. Asian employment grew 5.9 percent to 7,206 jobs. People who claimed two or more races grew employment by 31 percent to 1,515 jobs.

In another category, computer systems design jobs in Minnesota, where jobs pay up to $100,000, black employment grew 26 percent to 1,147 jobs between 2013 and 2015. Hispanic employment grew 23 percent to 1,050. Total employment in the sector grew only 9 percent to 34,264 jobs.

The Minnesota economy is growing, the unemployment rate is below 4 percent, considered full employment, and the emerging workforce, which includes proportionately more minorities, is filling job openings, including those of thousands of retiring baby boomers each year.

“Employers are struggling to find qualified applicants,” said Mitzi Hobot, who runs Takoda Group at AIOIC and who works with employers on internships, training and job placement. “Most minority candidates don’t have the technical or professional work experience of four-year college graduation rates of Caucasian counterparts. We try to equalize that.”

Nonprofit

AIOIC, funded through government grants and training contracts, tuition and private donations, is a $4.3 million-revenue school with about 550 students. The curriculum ranges from adult basic education for those who need a high school diploma to computer-related training. Nearly 200 students are trained annually at Takoda Institute, which offers several certification programs.

AIOIC’s typical student is a 43-year-old black or American Indian with a household income of $13,000. About 75 percent of graduates last year were placed in jobs with average salaries of about $34,000. The technology jobs secured by Takoda Institute pay more.

The Takoda Group was started several years ago within AIOIC to train IT students, attract employer attention and investment, and operate a fee-earning placement agency for students from area community colleges. Takoda also operates a small IT services business and creative agency that serves clients and also provides students with critical experience.

“Employers two or three years ago thought they had enough candidates from four-year colleges,” Hobot recalled. “They can use us now. Some of them move up some of their existing workers and backfill with our trainees.”

Takoda has a growing client list of 100 employers, large and small, including St. Jude Medical, Impact Group, Medtronic, U.S. Bank, the Animal Humane Society, Indian Health Board, IT Nation, Target, Toshiba and local governments.